Topic: Jamaican Lottery Scam
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Wed 10/04/17 10:56 AM
Edited by alleoops on Wed 10/04/17 11:04 AM
8 Jamaican Lottery Scam Suspects Set to Appear in US Court
Eight more people are set to make court appearances in the U.S. in what authorities say is a multimillion-dollar lottery scam that victimized dozens of Americans.


BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — Eight more people are set to make court appearances in the U.S. in what authorities say is a multimillion-dollar Jamaican lottery scam that victimized dozens of Americans.

The eight suspects were being extradited from Jamaica and were to appear in federal court in Bismarck, North Dakota, on Thursday.

Authorities allege the sophisticated scam bilked at least 90 mostly elderly Americans out of more than $5.7 million.

Fifteen suspects each are charged with 66 total counts of conspiracy, wire fraud, mail fraud and money laundering. Lavrick Willocks, who authorities say was the mastermind, pleaded not guilty in January.

Among the remaining defendants, one is awaiting trial in Rhode Island, one is in custody in Jamaica awaiting extradition to the U.S., and the remaining four defendants are still fugitives.

500 more wanted! - US warns of wave of extradition requests as 8 J'cans are sent to stand trial for scamming

PROSECUTORS in several cities across the United States (US) are getting ready to unleash a wave of up to 500 extradition requests for Jamaicans they believe are involved in the deadly lottery scam.

Joshua Polacheck, counsellor for public affairs at the United States Embassy in Kingston, revealed yesterday that "a few" requests for the extradition of alleged lottery scammers are already with the Jamaican Government and warned that American prosecutors had "dozens" of cases that are "at the extradition stage".

"That means most of them are with US attorneys [offices], getting ready to be sent to the Ministry of Justice," Polacheck said when asked to define the "extradition stage".

Polacheck revealed, too, that Jamaican and US law enforcement agencies were jointly pursuing between 3,000 and 5,000 lottery scam investigations and indicated that as many as 300 cases were at the pre-extradition stage.

"This is just the tip of the iceberg. We expect to see just a steady flow of people going up to the United States to face justice for this crime," he declared.


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Wed 10/04/17 11:11 AM
Thats not a scam. The best scam going today is that Puerto Rico borrowed a crapload of money to rebuild the infrustructure and never did. Then the hurricane came and they are begging for more. I can care less about those ppl. They are not americans to me. Its a territory and is not on my flag i served for!

Just like Trump said in a nutshell::: Stop begging and help yourselves! PR bonds are worthless and are crashing faster then heck. To the loaded dingbats who bought them I say...TOO BAD! Take the hit and move on like the rest of us do!

Now the bond holders want a little relief. Really? When does the insanity of system loop holes end in this country?

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Wed 10/04/17 11:28 AM


What makes me shake my head is how people fall for ...... You have won!
How do you win something you never entered?
And then you have to pay to get that prize.... big red flag
Just start asking the W5 questions and the scam ball will soon start to
unravel because the answers you get won't be specific.... red flag

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Wed 10/04/17 12:44 PM

Thats not a scam. The best scam going today is that Puerto Rico borrowed a crapload of money to rebuild the infrustructure and never did. Then the hurricane came and they are begging for more. I can care less about those ppl. They are not americans to me. Its a territory and is not on my flag i served for!

Just like Trump said in a nutshell::: Stop begging and help yourselves! PR bonds are worthless and are crashing faster then heck. To the loaded dingbats who bought them I say...TOO BAD! Take the hit and move on like the rest of us do!

Now the bond holders want a little relief. Really? When does the insanity of system loop holes end in this country?


Freeloaderico!

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Wed 10/04/17 02:08 PM



What makes me shake my head is how people fall for ...... You have won!
How do you win something you never entered?
And then you have to pay to get that prize.... big red flag
Just start asking the W5 questions and the scam ball will soon start to
unravel because the answers you get won't be specific.... red flag


People are gullible

My x would fall for anything. One day I came home to a telephone bill of over $600.00

$540.00 of it was due to a phone call to " Madame Zelda".. the T.V. fortune teller... you know the ones on the T.V at 3am

When I asked my wife what happened she said " well, they were telling me my fortune and then put me on hold for a hour".. of course the meter didn't stop

I didn't pay it, told the good Madame to shove it up her a** and complained to the telephone company. They took the charge off.

a few months later the government shut her down

Another time I come home to a huge black oil stain on my living room carpet.. huge.She let some guy selling shampoo machines out of a van in, he dumped all this s**t out on my rug.. couldn't get it out.. but spread it wide and deep into the rug.. Told her he was going to the truck to get a " special formula" cleaner.. and the next thing she heard was his tires peeling out down the street

people are gullible


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Thu 10/05/17 07:52 PM
So many scams anymore.

Authorities allege the sophisticated scam bilked at least 90 mostly elderly Americans out of more than $5.7 million.

Holy crap.
That's nearly 65,000 per person.

I wonder what the scam is.

Like the Nigerian Prince? "I need $200 to pay a legal fee, I'll send you a million dollars once I pay the fine!"

Or a Nigerian Prince Craigslist purchaser? "I'll buy that tiger poster for 20, but send you a cashiers check for 1000, just wire me the difference!"
Or "just send me your bank account # and personal details and I'll wire the money."


I wonder if the people wrote a check and sent them money (for postage or legal fees), or gave them access to accounts which were then drained.


Or was it part of the "yes" scams?
Maybe "we have recorded them saying 'yes' to joining our Jamaican lottery, and minimum buy in is 60 grand, which we billed to their credit card #, which we bought off the web."

I know I've received a few phone calls the last couple of months ranging from "I'm nancy from the medical alert service/fraud alert/your credit card...hello? Hello? are you there? can you hear me okay?" to "hi? Can you hear me?"

Thanks to responding to the forums I've never answered the questions with just "yes."
But after I answer with "I can hear you" or "what's this in regards to?" or just setting the phone down as I drive and not talk thinking it's a sales cold call, they just hang up.

It still concerns me because it may mean they already have potentially private information about me, like credit card #'s.